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Leo Gomez
Leo Gomez

Lil Bam - Big 8 Flow (Official Music Video) PORTABLE



Bish at the Bank: Live in Baltimore is an official, previously unissued set of recordings by one of the unsung heroes of bepop jazz piano, Walter Bishop Jr., featuring a swinging trio with Harold Vick on saxophone, Lou McIntosh on bass and Dick Berk on drums. This hand-numbered (limited edition worldwide of 3000), double LP set was transferred from the original tape reels and is pressed on 180g vinyl and boasts 100 minutes of music, The gatefold sleeve includes an extensive booklet with essays by esteemed jazz journalist Ted Panken and jazz video journalist and friend of Bishop's, Bret Primack, rare photos by Don Schlitten, Raymod Ross and Jan Persson, and poetry pieces written by Bishop. The set is produced by label owner/musician Cory Weeds and "Jazz Detective" producer Zev Feldman.




Lil Bam - Big 8 Flow (Official Music Video)



Group Therapy is the third studio album by American nu metal band Dope. The enhanced portion of the album contains a music video for each song. Group Therapy shows the band expanding on the more alternative metal style music the band had started on their previous album, Life, and most of the industrial style music has been toned down. The album contains some of the band's most heavy and aggressive songs while certain songs such as "Sing", "Another Day Goes By" and "Easier" show a softer, more melodic sound. In the second half of 2004 the album had already sold about 37,749 in United States. "Now is the Time" was used in an episode of Dog the Bounty Hunter.20th Anniversary release.1."Falling Away" 2."Bitch" 3."I Am" 4."Motivation" 5."Sing" 6."Now Is the Time" 7."Paranoia"8."Bring It On" 9."Another Day Goes By" 10."Today Is the Day" 11."Burn" 12."Easier" 13."So Low"


2005's Mechanical Hand fine-tunes Horse the Band's entire operation. Erik Engstrom's keyboard still guides these songs, and often recalls the mechanistic, gawky robot feel of '80s video game music. But Engstrom and Horse the Band recall the 1980s in general, too. "Manateen" is incredible. It starts out by ripping off the same tubular Duran Duran groove that's responsible for the Killers, but shifts garishly into an angular post-hardcore screech, like a noisier version of what Fugazi were doing at decade's end. Horse aren't finished. "Manateen" goes on to crash soft synth melodies into righteous hardcore, and despite these jarring parts and sounds, Mechanical Hand never sounds as fragmented as R. Borlax. The experiments continue. Arrows whiz by, men scream, and drawn swords rattle over the rolling snare of "Heroes Die"'s intro; it soon becomes a monolithic metal trudge. Shades of Iron Maiden, Brainiac, White Zombie, Converge, Dig Dug, and Mario Cart bare their teeth on "House of God" and "Octopus on Fire"; the keyboard stabs away, the guitars ring with something approaching anthemic or at least thickheaded glory, and Nathan Winneke's vocals go from yowl to growl to snark in the twist of an elbow1. Birdo 2. A Million Exploding Suns 3. Manateen 4. The House of Boo 5.Heroes Die 6. Softer Sounds 7. Octopus on Fire 8. Soaring Quails 9. Taken by Vultures 10. A Rusty Glove 11. Sand 12. Lord Gold Throneroom 13. The Black Hole


14 million streams ago...God, where to start? We formed in the late-70s to play a special Mass for the Bishop at Our Lady of Perpetual Help Church in Brooklyn. Most of us met for the first time while rehearsing for that Mass and decided to keep in touch. We realized that Catholics (we were all Roman Catholics at the time) had nowhere to go to hear fun, inspirational music, so we began playing church halls and schools doing "rocked-up" versions of songs we pulled out of hymnals. Eventually some of us wrote our own stuff. We played hundreds of shows over the next 4 years, passing the hat for donations to pay for necessities that we needed to keep the group going (microphones, wires, gas for the van, and eventually, the "First Fruit" album, which we sold at concerts for just about cost). It was never about the money; it was all about spreading the Good News and having fun doing it. We consistently lost members through the years and gave our last concert in December 1983. Doug Prinzivalli, who owned a video copy of our appearance on a local TV show sometime in 1982, had been running "where are they now" (or more specifically, "who are they") contests on his California blog for years. It wasn't until he got his hands on a copy of the album (which is amazing considering we only printed 1,000 or so) that he found my name and tracked me down. That video was originally put on YouTube not by Doug, but by some visitor to his blog who thought it was too good not to share. --Sal Polichetti (Sonseed) (This is an exclusive 2023 Record Store Day release.)1. Born of The Flesh 2. Another Kind of Love Song 3. Jesus Is A Friend of Mine 4. The Gospel Ship 5. Sonseed 6. The Opened Door 7. Sail On 8. Oh Happy Day 9. Gettin' Bacl 10. And The Father Will Dance 11. Say Yes


Braiding strands of protest and pleasure together into a seamless flow, rap initially expressed both gleeful and aggressive views of survival, social critique, and revelry to neighborhood audiences comprised primarily of African American and Latino youth. (4) Over time, however, and due in part to signal shifts in both commercial culture and the mass media, rap's audience grew beyond the bounds of neighborhood to encompass first the larger city of New York, later the nation (emerging first in a variety of regional flavors, then becoming regionally syncretized), and ultimately the globe. Today, Hip Hop culture, which encompasses not only rap music and videos but also particular forms of dress, dance, language, and attitude has been described as the new global cultural dominant. One thing that has not changed about Hip Hop, however, is that it continues to represent the voices and visions of the culturally, politically, and economically marginal and disenfranchised. Even as Hip Hop becomes global, its perspective is still centered in the experiences of the underdogs and it still expresses the cultural flair of African American and Latino people. 041b061a72


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